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Case Name Don't Shoot Portland v. City of Portland PN-OR-0002
Docket / Court 3:20-cv-00917 ( D. Or. )
State/Territory Oregon
Case Type(s) Policing
Special Collection COVID-19 (novel coronavirus)
Police Violence Protests (Spring/Summer 2020)
Case Summary
COVID-19 Summary: On June 5, 2020, a non-profit corporation advocating for social and racial justice and individual citizens filed this class action suit for violations of their First and Fourth Amendment rights. Plaintiffs sought injunctive relief enjoining Portland police from using tear gas. On ... read more >
COVID-19 Summary: On June 5, 2020, a non-profit corporation advocating for social and racial justice and individual citizens filed this class action suit for violations of their First and Fourth Amendment rights. Plaintiffs sought injunctive relief enjoining Portland police from using tear gas. On June 9, the court granted the TRO and enjoined the defendants from using tear gas, and the TRO was expanded to include non-lethal weapons on June 26. On June 30, the plaintiffs moved for a finding of contempt and for sanctions against the defendant for non-compliance. They also sought a preliminary injunction.


On June 5, 2020, Don't Shoot Portland, a non-profit corporation that advocates for social and racial justice in Portland, and individual Portland residents filed this class action suit in the United States District Court for the District of Oregon. Plaintiffs, represented by the Oregon Justice Resource Center and private counsel, sued the City of Portland under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, alleging that the City violated plaintiffs' rights under the First and Fourth Amendments. Specifically, plaintiffs asserted that defendant's indiscriminate use of tear gas against crowds of non-violent protestors participating in protected speech was unconstitutional. The plaintiffs further contended that the use of tear gas was particularly dangerous during the global COVID-19 pandemic. Plaintiffs, who simultaneously filed a motion for temporary restraining order (TRO), sought injunctive relief enjoining the City of Portland from using tear gas as a crowd control measure. Plaintiffs also sought attorney's fees. The case was assigned to Judge Marco A. Hernandez.

Plaintiffs asserted that beginning on May 29, 2020, and continuing every night for more than a week, Portland residents "demonstrated in the streets demanding justice for George Floyd and demanding an end to police violence." Plaintiffs alleged that defendant, in response to these protests, acted unlawfully by "tacitly and explicitly authoriz[ing] the use of indiscriminate crowd control munitions on crowds of protesters by justifying uses of similar tactics, including tear gas shot indiscriminately into crowds of protesters" that had committed no criminal acts and posed no threat of violence. Plaintiffs also asserted that they "were engaged in constitutionally protected acts of free speech" and that defendant's "continued use of tear gas on protesters . . . would chill a reasonable person from continuing to engage in protected First Amendment Activity."

Plaintiffs also stated that the "use of tear gas is particularly dangerous at the present time because it is specifically designed to irritate the respiratory system and to cause people to expel mucus and aspirated saliva," which is the principal way in which COVID-19 spreads. The complaint included a statement from a local university president expressing concern that "the use of tear gas could significantly exacerbate the spread [of COVID-19]."

Plaintiffs defined the proposed class as "all individuals who currently or who will in the future engage in protest activities that follow the death of George Floyd opposing police violence and white supremacy."

On June 6, the defendants responded to the motion, arguing that during the thirty-five days of protests, there had also been violent riots, and such measures are necessary to ensure that "peaceful protestors have a full and free opportunity to exercise their constitutional rights, while preventing rioters from injuring people and doing significant damage to property." They argued that the plaintiffs did not meet their burden of demonstrating a likelihood of success on the merits, irreparable harm, that the balance of hardships weighs in their favor, or that an injunction would be in the public interest.

On June 9, the plaintiff's motion for a temporary restraining order was granted in part, and restricted the defendants from using tear gas or its equivalent for 14 days, limiting their usage to situations in which the lives or safety of the public or the police are at risk.

On June 18, the plaintiffs filed an amended complaint, claiming that the defendants had changed their methods since the TRO, using a variety of "less-lethal” weapons indiscriminately against plaintiffs instead.

The plaintiffs filed a second amended complaint on June 24 adding an additional plaintiff. They further sought declaratory relief stating that the Portland Police Bureau’s Crowd Control Directive violated the Fourth Amendment.

On June 26, the parties stipulated to an additional TRO which additionally restricted the use of less lethal launchers, rubber ball distraction devices, aerosol restraints, and long-range acoustical devices. The district court approved the order the same day, and the order is in effect until July 24.

On June 30, the plaintiffs filed a motion for a finding of contempt and for sanctions against the defendant. They claimed that Portland Police Bureau members used "less-lethal weapons” in violation of the June 26 order on June 27-28. Therefore, they sought the following:
  1. A complete ban on the use of certain “less lethal weapons” in any crowd control situation.
  2. A requirement that any use of “less lethal weapons” must be specifically authorized by a politically accountable leader, such as Mayor Ted Wheeler, the commissioner of the Portland Police Bureau.
  3. Prohibiting the individual members who violated the Court’s order from participating in any future crowd control operations.
  4. Compensatory fines of sufficient size to compensate the individual class members for their injuries and deter future violations.

The same day, they moved for a preliminary injunction prohibiting the defendants from using “less lethal” weapons against protesters who were only engaged in passive resistance. They requested that if such weapons must be used, the defendants must ensure that no one engaging in passive resistance was impacted.

A week later, defendants submitted their responses in opposition to plaintiffs' request for a TRO. The City of Portland and Multnomah County submitted separate but substantively similar responses to the plaintiffs' request for a TRO. They argued that the plaintiffs should be denied the TRO because they could not demonstrate a likelihood of success on the merits, they would not be irreparably harmed without the TRO, and the balance of equities did not weigh in plaintiffs' favor. They also argued that, were the judge to grant the TRO, the version proposed by plaintiffs was too restrictive.

By mid-July, the plaintiffs submitted a supplemental memorandum supporting their motion to hold the defendants in contempt. They argued that the PPB's use of "less-lethal" weapons and tear gas on several occasions in late June represented violations of the court's Less Lethal Weapons Order and the Tear Gas Order. The defendants did not deny that the PPB used these tactics, but that their use of tear gas and less-lethal weapons fell within the limitations of those orders (to protect public safety).

The case is ongoing as of August 6, 2020.

Aaron Gurley - 06/08/2020
Averyn Lee - 07/30/2020
Jack Hibbard - 08/06/2020


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Issues and Causes of Action
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Issues
Constitutional Clause
Freedom of speech/association
Defendant-type
Jurisdiction-wide
General
Excessive force
Pattern or Practice
Restraints : chemical
Plaintiff Type
Non-profit NON-religious organization
Private Plaintiff
Causes of Action 42 U.S.C. § 1983
Declaratory Judgment Act, 28 U.S.C. § 2201
Defendant(s) City of Portland
Plaintiff Description An organization advocating for social and racial justice and individual Portland residents. Proposed class: "all individuals who currently or who will in the future engage in protest activities that follow the death of George Floyd opposing police violence and white supremacy."
Class action status sought Yes
Class action status granted Pending
Filed Pro Se No
Prevailing Party None Yet / None
Public Int. Lawyer Yes
Nature of Relief None yet
Source of Relief None yet
Filed 06/05/2020
Case Ongoing Yes
Additional Resources
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Docket(s)
3:20-cv-00917-HZ (D. Or.)
PN-OR-0002-9000.pdf | Detail
Date: 07/13/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
General Documents
Complaint [ECF# 1]
PN-OR-0002-0001.pdf | Detail
Date: 06/05/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
Order [ECF# 29] (2020 WL 3078329) (D. Or.)
PN-OR-0002-0003.pdf | WESTLAW | Detail
Date: 06/09/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
First Amended Complaint [ECF# 35]
PN-OR-0002-0002.pdf | Detail
Date: 06/18/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
Second Amended Complaint [ECF# 38]
PN-OR-0002-0004.pdf | Detail
Date: 06/24/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
Stipulated Additional Temporary Restraining Order [ECF# 43] (D. Or.)
PN-OR-0002-0005.pdf | Detail
Date: 06/26/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
Plaintiffs' Motion for Finding of Contempt and for Sanctions Against Defendant City of Portland [ECF# 55, 55-1]
PN-OR-0002-0006.pdf | Detail
Date: 06/30/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
Defendant City of Portland's Response to Plaintiffs' Motion for Preliminary Injunction and Declaration of Craig Dobson [ECF# 67 & 105]
PN-OR-0002-0007.pdf | Detail
Date: 07/06/2020
Source: PACER [Public Access to Court Electronic Records]
show all people docs
Judges Hernandez, Marco Antonio (D. Or.) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0003 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Plaintiff's Lawyers Albies, Jessica Ashlee (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Bruggemeier, Franz H. (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Chavez, Juan C. (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Meggitt, Alexander (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Merrithew, Jesse A (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Plesser, Brittney (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Rinta, Maya (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Safarian, Viktoria (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Stark, Whitney B (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0001 | PN-OR-0002-0002 | PN-OR-0002-0004 | PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0006 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Defendant's Lawyers Jones, B Andrew (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-9000
Moede, J. Scott (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0007 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Sheffield, Naomi (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0007 | PN-OR-0002-9000
Yamachika, Robert (Oregon) show/hide docs
PN-OR-0002-0005 | PN-OR-0002-0007 | PN-OR-0002-9000

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